Top Ten Tuesday: Least Destructive Dogs

September 23, 2008 · Print This Article

Last week’s Top Ten Tuesday post was about the most destructive dogs, based on a survey of 3,000 customers of UK pet insurance carrier Esure.  This week, we bring you the opposite – the breeds found least destructive by the same survey.

 

Each of these breeds were responsible for less than $2 worth of damage.  I’m sorry, but in my humble opinion, any dog who can’t do more than $2 worth of damage can’t really be a dog!

 

King Charles Spaniel

Border Terrier

Cocker Spaniel

Old English Sheepdog

Highland Terrier

Corgi

Poodle

Pointer

Saint Bernard

Pug

 

Until next time,

Good day, and good dog!

Comments

2 Responses to “Top Ten Tuesday: Least Destructive Dogs”

  1. Karen on September 29th, 2008 10:09 am

    Help!!! After being “petless” for 5 years, my husband and I decided to get another dog. After much research because we are now older (I am 55 and my husband is 68) and we have young grandchildren (5 and under), I decided on a cockapoo. Supposedly “easy to train” and “non-destructive”, I am struggling with both. She is now almost 5 months old and while we both work fulltime and I can deal with some occasional “accidents”, my biggest problem is CHEWING! And I mean everything and anything! Unless I have her in eyesight every moment, she will inevitably get something. Last night it was a piece of outgoing mail! I had to do a new envelope and enclose a note with the check that said “the dog ate it … literally”. I don’t want to give her up … but I don’t know what to do. Crating her 24/7 does not constitute having a pet and companion! Help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  2. sherry on September 29th, 2008 10:53 am

    Hi Karen,

    We have an article in the Dog Den that has some tips for chewing puppies: http://www.doggies.com/articles/8-training-begins-with-your-puppy's-first-steps.html

    In a nutshell what you want to do is provide LOTS of appropriate things for her to chew on. Take things away from her and firmly say “NO” when she gets hold of something you don’t want her chewing and give her one of her own toys. And praise the heck out of her whenever you see her chewing her toys on her own. If you’re consistent she should figure it out and become the companion you want her to be. Have you read any puppy training books for more detailed help with this?

    Best of luck! Do let us know how it goes with her chewing.

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