Slate.com’s Big Graph of Dog Data

from Slate.com
from Slate.com
Earlier this month, Slate.com ran a graphic excerpted from David McCandless’ book Knowledge Is Beautiful: Impossible Ideas, Invisible Patterns, Hidden Connections–Visualized.

Each dog breed is pictured to indicate size, and color-coded by breed group. Dogs facing the left side of the graph are supposed to be less intelligent than those shown facing the right.

Dogs closer to the top of the graph are more popular than those at the bottom, while those closer to the right side scored highest on a cost-benefit analysis performed by the author than those on the left side.

The analysis was performed by adding together a score on intelligence, longevity, common ailments, and cost, then subtracting out the grooming and appetite scores.

The dogs whose public hype most closely matched their high cost-benefit scores include Labs, Poodles, Dachshunds, Mini Schnauzers, Cockers, and Brittanies. And if you look closely, you’ll see a cat in there as well.) Dogs who showed as overlooked treasures include Affenpinschers, Welsh Springer Spaniels, and Border Terriers, while Great Danes, Boxers, St. Bernards, Mastiffs, and especially Bulldogs were depicted as inexplicably over-rated.

An interesting graphic, and a lot of information to digest. If all of the info in the book is this in-depth, I think my head might explode if I attempted to read it!

Until next time,
Good day, and good dog!

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