Tag Archives: breeders

Pandemic Puppy Scam

Tips to avoid a scam:

Never buy online. You want to see both the puppy and its parents up close and in person.

Ask lots of questions of the breeder, and expect them to ask you questions, too.

A reputable breeder will not have more than 2 – 3 breeds they deal with. They should be experts in the breeds they sell.

A reputable breeder will not have more than a litter or two at a time. Puppies are a lot of work, and giving them a proper start in life requires a lot of time.

Make sure you see health records of the parents and the puppy.

Expect the breeder to have a waiting list.

Know that you may not get a puppy quickly. This is a 10 – 15 year commitment, so you don’t need to finalize the decision today. Take the time to get it right.

Last, but not least, NO PUPPIES UNDER THE CHRISTMAS TREE!

Until next time,
Good day, and good dog!

Have You Found Us on Facebook Yet?

Like thumb upJust in case you didn’t know, both doggies.com and our sister site, breeders.net, have Facebook pages. The doggies.com page carries funny, heartwarming, and newsworthy information about dogs in general, while the breeders.net page focuses more specifically on purebreds.

The doggies page is getting awfully close to 10,000 likes – I’d sure love to see us break that record!

If you haven’t already done so, pop over to Facebook and give us a big thumbs up by clicking “Like Page”.

Until next time,
Good day, and good dog!

Tuesday Top Ten: Health-related questions to ask a breeder

Choosing a new puppy can be nerve-wracking because you want to find the healthiest possible puppy.  You may have a number of other concerns such as temperament and “fit” with your family, but the number one concern should be the health of the puppy.  How to make sure?  Start with the following ten questions which you can use to interview a number of breeders before deciding which one you will work with.

Continue reading Tuesday Top Ten: Health-related questions to ask a breeder

Where do people get their dogs?

Pet SourceA recent survey of people who have gotten pets (cats as well as dogs) within the past 12 months. I thought the findings were kind of interesting:

25% got their pet from a family member
24% got their pet from a shelter (those making more than $55,000 a year are more likely to choose this option than those making less)
19% took in a stray
12% bought from a purebred breeder
8% bought from a pet store
5% kept the offspring of their own pet

In another finding, 42% of people who added a dog or cat to their family did NO research before making the move. This is scary because the number one reason why animals are dropped off at shelters is because the pet didn’t meet the expectations of the family. Kind of hard to have realistic expectations when you don’t do your research first.

Come back tomorrow to take our Saturday Survey so we can all find out if our readers mirror the general population or not.

Until next time,

Good day, and good dog!