Tag Archives: senior dogs

November is Adopt A Senior Pet Month

Happy Elderly DogPetfinder.com is celebrating November as Adopt-A-Senior-Pet Month.

“Think of a pet that is already trained and doesn’t chew or scratch everything in sight — a pet who will love you unconditionally,” said Kim Saunders, Petfinder.com’s Vice President of Shelter Outreach and Public Relations. “That’s what you get when you adopt a senior pet.” Continue reading November is Adopt A Senior Pet Month

Saturday Survey: Senior Dog Adoption

We’ve featured a couple of blog posts about senior dogs this week. Would you consider adopting one?

Would you consider adopting a senior dog?

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Until next time,
Good day, and good dog!

Saturday Survey: Canine Retirement Homes

rp_Saturday-Survey-Graphic-350x2331-350x233-350x233.jpgI posted earlier this week about a Japanese retirement home for elderly dogs who need special care. Assuming there was such a home near you, would you consider sending your dog there?

Would you send your dog to a retirement home?

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Until next time,
Good day, and good dog!

November is Senior Pet Month

Photo:  Dogs Naturally Magazine
Photo: Dogs Naturally Magazine

November is Senior Pet Month, when we are encouraged to adopt dogs who already have a few miles on them. According to the ASPCA, “Animal shelters across the country are full of animals of all shapes, sizes, breeds and ages, but senior pets are typically the most difficult to place.”

The advantage to adopting an older dog, of course, is that you don’t have to put up with the annoying puppy behaviors of chewing, messing inside the house, and wanting to play all day, every day. Of course, senior dogs aren’t necessarily as cute as puppies, but they may also be already socialized to people and other animals, and may even be obedience-trained.

If you’re going to adopt from a shelter, try to find a place where you can play with the dog outside of his or her cage. Their personalities tend to totally change when they get somewhere else, such as an outside play area. Many dogs in shelters are confused as to why they are there, and they often are depressed about being isolated in cages all day. Ask to see the dog outside on a leash or in a fenced area to get a better idea of the dog’s personality.

Many shelters and rescues work with foster homes, where you can see dogs in a more natural environment and talk to the foster family about their personality and suitability for your family.

Don’t pass by the dogs with a little grey on their muzzles. Many times, they are exactly what you are looking for! And you will feel good knowing that you’re giving them an opportunity to live out their senior years in a loving home rather than in a shelter cage.

Until next time,
Good day, and good dog!