Why a Crate for Your Dog?

Save, secure and happy
I cringe whenever I hear a well-intentioned person say, “I would never put my dog in a cage.” That statement comes not from a well-informed perspective, but rather from our having grown up going to zoos and seeing the animals behind bars, primarily to protect US from THEM. A crate is just the opposite… it’s main purpose is to protect the dog from us!

Dogs are a den animal. Dogs inherit their “den” nature from their distant ancestor, the wolf. Wolves create a den in a cave so they can rest in a safe, secure place… where no predator will stumble on them while they are not alert. Our modern day dogs value a crate, their “den”, as a place where then can go and no one will accidentally step on them (why do you think they like to jump up on furniture when we’re not looking?) and no well-meaning but perhaps not-so-gentle children’s fingers can poke them in the eye.

If you start early enough, a crate can be a huge asset in your housetraining program. Puppies, like wolf cubs, instinctively will not soil the area where they eat and sleep.

So, remember, to your dog, her crate is her den, not her jail cell!

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5 thoughts on “Why a Crate for Your Dog?”

  1. A crate can be just about anywhere. Keep it out of the sun, make sure you keep adequate water inside. For a pup in training, make sure the crate isn’t bigger than the pup’s bedding… s/he’ll pee in the non-bedding area. Put in something like a box to keep puppy away from the non-bed area

  2. I am in search of rottweiller pup, but not sure if this type of dog would be right for us. The dogs that I have had in the past was Great Danes, German Shephards, Lhaso Apso.

    I have two teenage sons and was told that Rottweillers are very loyal to their family and are great with children.

    I am not familiar with their temperment and need some guidance on this breed. Those the owner have to have a particular personality to deal with this breed.

    Any suggestions you can provide would be helpful.

  3. Hi Jude,

    This is a kind of off the wall idea, but I have an idea that might just work.

    Get something really hot and sharp tasting like Tabasco Sauce. Put some all over your ankles (make sure you don’t leave any on your hands), call Easter and let her have a go at your ankles while you’re petting her with your hands. She’ll know you love her, but at the same time she’ll get a clear message that ankles are off limits.

    Let us know if it works!

    Frank

  4. We have a 14 week old pup. Mom is pure bred Siberian Husky and dad is a pure bred boxer. She has blue eyes and a boxer build.

    We are having serious problems with her nipping at us. We crate her during the day, I come home at noon to let her out and walk her, we walk her at night or play in the back yard and she sleeps with us each night (hubby’s idea…not mine). We have had a trainer work with us and the pup, Easter, is great when he’s here when we are alone with her she is a pain and goes for ankles or any other skin she can nip.

    Both my husand and I look like we have been in an accident from all the bites. She is on a good dog food and we just don’t want else to do. HELP anyone.

    We want to get her spayed but the vets around here won’t do it until she is over 5 months old and I hate to wait that long.

    HELP…anyone how can we make this sometimes really good dog a really good dog all the time?

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